Television that Needs More Love: Mighty Orbots

In the primeval year 1984, I ran across a keen animated show called Mighty Orbots on ABC.  It only ran for a single season before disappearing without a trace.  Years later when describing it to others, skepticism arose.  No one else acknowledged its existence.  At times I wondered whether or not I had hallucinated the entire series. 

Then came the wonder of the internet and–voila!–it turns out to have existed after all.  Although I didn’t know why it disappeared.  It was vastly superior to the other animated shows at the time, especially the shows it derived from–namely Voltron and Transformers.  With superior animation, better characters and decent writing, the show should have been renewed for several seasons.

Unfortunately not.  My suspicions leaned towards poor marketing, but a lawsuit by Tonka was the real culprit.  Tonka accused the show owners of ripping off their GoBots franchise.  For those of you unfamiliar with GoBots, those were a toy line that basically ripped off Transformers and had its own animated series Challenge of the Gobots (the animation was weak, however the writing wasn’t terrible.)  GoBots has since faded into obscurity and I wouldn’t expect to see a big screen adaptation anytime soon.  Anyway, Tonka torpedoes Mighty Orbots and we only get a single season.  Pity.

The basis for the show is familiar.  Six robots with individual powers merge to form a more powerful robot.  Nothing new there.  However, the robots all have unique powers.  Tor is a super-strong brute.  Bort is a skinny ‘geek’ that can shape shift.  Bo is a ‘female’ Orbot with the ability to control the four elements (earth, air, fire and water.)  Boo is another ‘female’ Orbot with light and illusion powers.  Crunch is a ‘fat’ robot that can eat anything and transform it into energy for the rest.  Ohno is the last Orbot, and she’s a tiny ‘child’ robot who is necessary for the other Orbots to merge into “Mighty Orbot”. 

The leader and leader of the Orbots is Rob Simmons, who is your standard Nerdy Scientist Hero archetype.  He actually has a secret identity when he isn’t working with the Galactic Patrol (which is exactly what they sound like.)  They fight the obligatory evil organization SHADOW in the far future.

The tone of the series was light-hearted and much closer to an American superhero team than either Voltron or Transformers.  The Orbots have ‘superpowers’ instead of a bunch of guns and unlike Voltron, are actually pretty competent and interesting individually.  Also unlike Voltron, this wasn’t a simple Japanese import.  They produced this show specifically for American audiences and it feels like it.  The animation is first rate, especially for a television series.

I watched a couple of episodes recently and, yes, it’s a kid’s show and a bit dated, but still not bad.  Despite having only a single 13-episode season, it also does what few other franchised animated shows do: has an ending.  At the end of the only season, Mighty Orbots fight and defeat the ‘big bad’ leader of SHADOW, a supercomputer critter called Umbra.  So you can watch the only season and still get a satisfying conclusion.

Go check it out. 

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Moments of Coolness #4: The Incredibles Family Reunion & Dash

the-incredibles-04I absolutely adore Pixar’s The Incredibles.  This is (as has been noted by others) how The Fantastic Four should have been.  Almost everything clicks in this movie.  The animation is great, the soundtrack is stellar and the voice actors are terrific.  This, however, is not the gist of my Moment of Coolness.  There are two moments in it that rise above the rest of the film.

No, I’m not talking about Edna Mode (although I adore her as well.)  There is one scene with Dash and one scene with the whole family.  The scenes are close together in the movie but have two separate impacts.  They’re brief, but rise above the rest of the film in a subtle fashion.

Let’s talk about Dash’s scene first.

On the surface, it’s just a nifty action scene.  Dash runs from the flying evil minions in their hovercraft.  Some people have compared it to the speeder bike scene from Return of the Jedi.  There is some resemblance there, but there’s a lot more to it.  The true Moment of Coolness comes when Dash runs out of the jungle onto a lake.  He didn’t realize it was there, and before he knows it, his feet hit the water.  And he keeps running.  He looks down and realizes what he’s doing and lets out a laugh of pure joy. 

the-incredibles-03This is the first time in his life that Dash realizes just what he’s capable of doing.  He sees what his full potential is and he can’t help but laugh.  No one else is around to hear his laugh or see what he’s doing, but it doesn’t matter–he sees it.  It’s the first time he’s seen his power as a gift instead of a curse.  It’s a powerful–but subtle–scene.  Brad Bird pulls it off beautifully.

The second Moment of Coolness scene happens shortly after the Dash scene.

The family gets reunited in the jungle and there’s a moment of familial affection.  A moment later, the evil minions show up and start attacking.  That’s when mom and dad become Elastigirl and Mr. Incredible.  They take down the minions (who had been giving the kids such fits) in seconds with consummate ease.

the-incredibles-01This is the Moment of Coolness.  For the very first time, Dash and Violet realize that mom and dad aren’t just mom and dad.  Their parents are two veteran, kick-ass superheroes.  This is meant to be a metaphor for the first time children realize their parents had lives before them.  That parents are more than just parents.

This realization is summed up in Dash and Violet in just two words: “Wow!” and “Whoa!”

the-incredibles-05Absolutely brilliant.  Brad Bird, I would bear your children, were I so equipped.

So I guess that’s all I’ve got to say about that.

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